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How a Social Profession Embraces Social Media

Journalism is a social profession.  From an interviewee to a source to your audience, reporting the news requires communicating with many people.  It’s a vocation of asking the right questions and really listening to what is being said.  It is a career built upon community.  Therefore, it’s completely logical that social media would be an ideal tool for this collaboration.

Newsroom culture is decisively evolving with a considerable emphasis on digital and social media.  Its not uncommon for traditional journalists to be resistant to implementing social media into their daily routine.  They often view it as a new technology rather than a medium of sharing information.  One way of overcoming newsroom opposition to social media is to show conventional reporters how these tools can make their job easier and more effective.   Here we look at three specific newsroom roles and how they can get the most benefit out of these powerful channels.

Foreign News Correspondent

A foreign news correspondent needs to report news from a country different from where their news organization is based.  This journalist can overcome geographic barriers as well as report the news at a rapid speed using a social platform such as Twitter.  They can easily reach millions of people around the world, find new sources to help develop stories and present their content in real time on this channel.

Clarissa Ward is a senior international news correspondent with CNN based in London.  Below is an example of how she uses Twitter to share information she gathered in Syria.  This particular post was retweeted 19 times so far.

Local Beat Editor

This type of journalist needs to reach out to their local community.   A platform like Facebook could be very beneficial for social listening and connecting a journalist their audience.  It can provide answers to “What is your community talking about right now?”, “What concerns do they have?”, and “What are they most interested in?”.  Social media can assist a local beat editor in getting to know their audience so they can better serve them.

Dayna Roselli, local news personality in Las Vegas, uses Facebook to interact with her community.  In this post, Dayna is introducing a new feature to KTNV’s website where viewers can upload surveillance video from their home to help police identify burglary suspects in the area.

Submit your surveillance or phone video to our NEW “Caught On Camera” section. You will be able to see what’s happening in your neighborhood! I explain how it all works in this video.

Posted by Dayna Roselli on Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Television News Cameraman

A photojournalist could find many benefits in using social media to showcase visual images and video content.  They can give the audience a behind the scenes perspective or help them tell a story in a new way.  Channels such as Vine, Instagram and Periscope are becoming increasingly popular for reporters to share photos and videos.

Vines are extremely sharable and since they are only six seconds long, they can quickly be uploaded and shared via social media.  Here is a look at how one journalist used Vine to record the aftermath of a suicide bombing of a US Embassy in Turkey.